Journal cover Journal topic
Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 1.329 IF 1.329
  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 1.394 IF 5-year
    1.394
  • CiteScore<br/> value: 1.27 CiteScore
    1.27
  • SNIP value: 0.903 SNIP 0.903
  • SJR value: 0.709 SJR 0.709
  • IPP value: 1.455 IPP 1.455
  • h5-index value: 20 h5-index 20
NPG cover
Executive editors: 
Roger
 
Grimshaw
(chief-executive editor)
,
Ana M.
 
Mancho
Daniel
 
Schertzer
Olivier
 
Talagrand
&
Stéphane
 
Vannitsem

Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (NPG) is an international, interdisciplinary journal for the publication of original research furthering knowledge on nonlinear processes in all branches of Earth, planetary, and solar system sciences. The editors encourage submissions that apply nonlinear analysis methods to both models and data.

The journal maintains sections for research articles, review articles, brief communications, comments and replies, and book reviews, as well as special issues.

News

New article processing charges for NPG

05 Dec 2017

From 1 January 2018 Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (NPG) will slightly increase the article processing charges.

New institutional agreement between the PIK and Copernicus Publications

24 Aug 2017

Authors from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) will profit from a new institutional agreement with Copernicus Publications starting 23 August 2017. The agreement which is valid for the first author enables a direct settlement of article processing charges (APCs) between the PIK and the publisher.

Update of publication policy

04 Jul 2017

The updated publication policy now is extended by the journal's open access statement, its archiving and indexing scheme, and explicit policies on corrections and retractions.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

The Hasselmann equation (HE) is the basis of modern surface ocean wave prediction models. Currently, they operate in the "black box with the tuning knobs" modes, since there is no consensus on universal wind input and wave-breaking dissipation source terms, and require re-tuning for different boundary and external conditions. We offer a physically justified framework able to reproduce theoretical properties of the HE and experimental field data without re-tuning of the model.

Vladimir Zakharov, Donald Resio, and Andrei Pushkarev

A new method of analysing pressure wave dependences is presented and tested against the published experimental data. Upon the results of examination of more than 90 rock samples, it was found that a significant portion of rocks ∼45 %) exhibit negative Poisson ratios at lower pressures. Such a significant number of naturally auxetic rocks suggests that the occurrence of negative Poisson ratios is not as exotic as assumed previously.

Vladimir Y. Zaitsev, Andrey V. Radostin, Elena Pasternak, and Arcady Dyskin

The influence of fluid injection on tectonic fault sliding and generation of seismic events was studied in the paper by a multi-degree-of-freedom rate-and-state friction model with a two-parametric friction law. The considered system could exhibit different types of motion. The main seismic activity could appear directly after the start of fluid injection or in the post-injection phase (after some days or months). Such an influence of injection on seismicity is observed in the real cases.

Sergey B. Turuntaev and Vasily Y. Riga

We use temperature maps of the solar corona for three regions and use a technique that separates multiple timescales and space scales to show that the small-scale temperature fluctuations appear more frequently prior to the occurrence of a solar flare, in comparison with the same region after the flare and with a quiet region. We find that, during the flare, energy flows from large to small scales and heat transport associated with a heat front is convective along and diffusive across the front.

D. Gamborino, D. del-Castillo-Negrete, and J. J. Martinell

The disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 on 8 March 2014 is one of the great mysteries of our time. The most relevant aspect is that not a piece of debris was found during the intensive surface search carried out for roughly 2 months following the crash. By combining different ocean data with dynamical systems tools, we propose a revised search strategy by showing why debris could not have been expected in some targeted search areas and determining regions where debris could be.

V. J. García-Garrido, A. M. Mancho, S. Wiggins, and C. Mendoza

Publications Copernicus